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Smalltown Supersound

Departed Glories

by Biosphere

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YuX Phasey
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YuX Phasey Biosphere aced the translation he wanted to convey in this album. I'm looking at Prokudin-Gorsky's photos while listening to this album, and it feels as though I could walk through the photographs for a moment. 4/5 Favorite track: Free From The Bondage You Are In.
Wyndham Rain
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Wyndham Rain The dead can sing and it sounds like this ... -- but who can take more than a small dose at a time of such echoes whose sources are now drowned in forgetfulness?
Its like descending into some forgotten cellar where 17 ancient jars, filled with the stuff of lives long-since lived, have lost their potential to nurture.
"Canned music" in the sublimest of senses.
Open them carefully, for they are all that is left.
quietplease
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quietplease I completely did not get this the first coupla listenings. Now I cannot imagine being without it.
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about

It’s easy to forget that Norway shares a short stretch of frontier with Russia, right at the northernmost tip of the country. That region is where Geir Jenssen, the Norwegian electronic producer behind Biosphere, comes from, and where he has been composing his austere, disturbing and deeply textured ambience since the early 1980s.

Biosphere has released many albums to date including 'Substrata,' voted the greatest ambient album of all time on the Hyperreal website, and has collaborated with Arne Nordheim, Higher Intelligence Agency, Deathprod, Pete Namlook and Bel Canto.

His 12th album 'Departed Glories' is his first in almost five years and marks a new deal with the Oslo independent label Smalltown Supersound. On the cover is a photo of the Russian landscape taken more than a hundred years ago. It’s part of an incredible cache of recently discovered images by the photographer Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky, who pioneered a form of colour photography using three sheets of glass, and left us with a collection of hauntingly beautiful pictures of a vanished world that could have been taken on an iPhone.

credits

released September 23, 2016

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